Surrey Fire & Rescue Service invests in state-of-the-art drones to keep communities and crew safe

Surrey Fire & Rescue Service have invested in five new state-of-the-art drones to help in life-threatening incidents to keep communities and crews safe.
Surrey Fire & Rescue Service have invested in five new state-of-the-art drones to help in life-threatening incidents to keep communities and crews safe. Picture contributedSurrey Fire & Rescue Service have invested in five new state-of-the-art drones to help in life-threatening incidents to keep communities and crews safe. Picture contributed
Surrey Fire & Rescue Service have invested in five new state-of-the-art drones to help in life-threatening incidents to keep communities and crews safe. Picture contributed

Equipped with the latest technology including thermal imaging, high-resolution imagery and the ability to live stream footage directly to the control centre, the new and improved drones are also readily available 24/7 and can fly for longer and in more extreme weather.

Fire Investigation Officers at Surrey Fire & Rescue Service, who are all specially trained to operate the equipment, first put drones into action in 2018 as part of a joint project with Surrey and Sussex Police. As an early adopter to trial the technology, and following its success, drones were soon identified as an essential tool in fire safety.

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They’ve provided vital support during emergencies, such as flooding, hazmat incidents, wildfires and missing persons investigations. The recent investment will further enhance how the service tackles these types of situations in protecting and safeguarding crews and the public.

Area Commander for Operational Response, Dave Nolan said: “Drones play a pivotal part in how we manage incidents, with specialist capabilities to save lives, locate casualties quickly, and reduce risks to our crews too.

“This £55,000 investment in state-of-the-art technology will only enhance our response. The new drones will provide incident commanders with the information they need to make rapid and informed decisions to reduce fire risks and other emergencies like never before.”

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