Views sought as Surrey road safety partners unite to combat road death and injury

Surrey County Council, Surrey Fire and Rescue Service, National Highways, Surrey Police and the Police and Crime Commissioner, have set out their plans to eliminate road collisions resulting in death or serious injury by 2050.
Surrey County Council, Surrey Fire and Rescue Service, National Highways, Surrey Police and the Police and Crime Commissioner, have set out their plans to eliminate road collisions resulting in death or serious injury by 2050. Picture: submittedSurrey County Council, Surrey Fire and Rescue Service, National Highways, Surrey Police and the Police and Crime Commissioner, have set out their plans to eliminate road collisions resulting in death or serious injury by 2050. Picture: submitted
Surrey County Council, Surrey Fire and Rescue Service, National Highways, Surrey Police and the Police and Crime Commissioner, have set out their plans to eliminate road collisions resulting in death or serious injury by 2050. Picture: submitted

In line with international and national best practice, a new, draft ‘Surrey RoadSafe Vision Zero’ strategy has been developed by the partners, which focusses on five areas to help minimise the risk on Surrey’s roads. These are:

Safe speeds – ensuring our roads have appropriate speed limits, people comply with speed limits, and they are safe for walkers and cyclists

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Safe road users – encouraging competent, safe and respectful road users

Safe roads and streets – streets that are well-designed, well-maintained streets and support active travel

Safe vehicles – vehicles are well-maintained and designed

Post Collision Response – a fast and effective multi-agency response to collisions.

Surrey County Council is carrying out a public consultation on the strategy that runs until 24 March 2024. The strategy proposes a 50% reduction of fatal and serious injuries by 2035 and a target of zero by 2050.

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Cllr Matt Furniss, Cabinet Member for Highways, Transport and Economic Growth, said, “In recent years the annual number of fatal casualties in Surrey has been roughly half the amount there used to be in the early 2000s. However between 20 and 30 people still tragically die on Surrey’s roads every year and many more are injured. I am acutely aware of the impact that road collisions have on individuals, their families and local communities and this is why we must set ourselves these ambitious targets.

“Road safety is a top priority for Surrey County Council. We’re also investing in more cycle and walking routes throughout the county, introducing lower speed limits on rural roads in the south of Surrey, improving crossing points around schools and providing cycle training for both children and adults.

“I would like to encourage all residents to have their say on our important proposals to help us drive down death and injuries in Surrey now and for our future generations.”

Dan Quin, Chief Fire Officer for Surrey Fire and Rescue Service – who is also National Fire Chief Council’s (NFCC) Road Safety Lead – said, “In Surrey, our fire and rescue teams attend more road traffic collisions than we do house fires. We have witnessed firsthand the life-changing injuries and the devastating impact on families who have lost loved ones. This collaborative strategy is our commitment to protecting road users. It’s a significant step towards creating a safer road environment for everyone. So please provide your input into our consultation to help shape a safer future for Surrey’s road network and its users.“

As well as the online consultation portal, hard copies of the strategy and questionnaire are also available in all Surrey Libraries and at Surrey County Council offices.